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Yes, it's all for real

Yes, it's all for real

November 22, 2012

A few people have asked me recently about how the posters are 'really' printed. They have seen the film, but thought that perhaps some artistic license was used when it came to portraying the printing. 

Well, I really have to emphasise that there was no artistic license used there whatsoever. What you see in the film is Graham Bignell pulling a print in his studio, on his Albion press. This is exactly how every single one of the limited edition Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite posters was printed. Some were pulled by Ian, a colleague of Graham's, but the process was the same. For each print, the type was inked, by hand, and then each one was pulled by hand – just like you see in the film.

While we were making the many alterations during the proofing stage, Graham let me pull a print. I was amazed at how much strength it required. Graham has a knack and makes it looks easy, but I had trouble with just that one! Needless to say, I left it to the experts...




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